Archive for the ‘Props’ Category

A while back I mentioned that I’m building a miniature tack room. I also mentioned that this is part of a larger, somewhat insane project, which will involve building multiple rooms that will (potentially) fit together to make a full stable set up. Or rather, the illusion of one.

This is something that I have been wanting to do for years, but wasn’t sure how to accomplish. The inspiration actually came from binge-watching behind the scenes footage of the Hobbit films last year.

One particular set (Erebor/Smaug’s lair) was created with multiple pieces that could be moved around to create the illusion of a much larger space when filmed from different angles. (well that and a whole lot of CGI!) I wondered if it would be possible to use a similar idea with this fantasy barn I’ve been dreaming about. I clearly do not have the space to build a massive barn set up, but multiple box rooms seem a lot more manageable.

Because I can never keep things simple, this project started out with a sketch of the entire barn layout. I really wanted things to make sense. Where are all the doors located? Windows? Stalls? Rooms? The arena? Once I was happy with the design I started to work on putting together the box rooms.

The first (and only I’ve tackled so far) is the tack room.

This is a 14in x 14in x 14in cardboard box cut down to size. Cardboard isn’t the sturdiest or nicest of materials to work with I know, but it’s a heck of a lot cheaper than wood and easier for me to cut.

The floor was made from large popsicle sticks, and the walls were covered with white poster board. I’ve posted tutorials on how I made the saddle and bridle racks, and since then I’ve added a utility sink…

…and a few more saddle racks. (got to have a place to store all those saddle pads, you know!)

Of course everything is lopsided. OF COURSE.

There’s also this crop/whip holder, which I threw together one night. Would there be an interest in a tutorial for it? The crops still need work… I have no idea what I’m doing.

The room isn’t totally complete, and it probably won’t be as I’m sure I’ll be going back to change, add or fix certain things later on.

To make as much use of the box as I could, I decorated two of the outside walls.

The first was made to look like the outside of the tack room:

It’s got a tiny bulletin board:

As well as a fire extinguisher, which was a dollhouse miniature I repainted with nail polish and added a proper label to.

The back wall with the window was made to look like the outside of the stable. It’s ugly because I messed up the siding and the window and, well, everything else…

Whoever is constructing this thing needs to be fired

But it’s not that noticeable in a background.

That’s all these are, really – elaborate backgrounds, haha!

But it’s fun and that’s what matters. The inner child is happy too. ๐Ÿ˜›

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Recently I was inspired to make hay bags for my models, and have turned it into a tutorial for you all.

This time I included Traditional, Classic and Schleich sizes on the pattern. ๐Ÿ™‚

You will need:

  • The Patternย – can’t open a PDF? Download this – it’s free!
  • Fabric (I use cotton as it’s easy to work with) + matching thread
  • 1/8 ribbon, jump rings and hook (etched or bent by hand)
  • Acrylic paint – this will be the “binding” around the edge
  • Fray Check, fabric glue (I use Fabri-Tac)
  • Iron – a flat iron can work nicely! ๐Ÿ˜‰

The first step is to iron your fabric to remove all wrinkles. Cut out your pattern and trace it onto the wrong side of your fabric. The pattern includes a seam allowance – you can add this in free hand or bend back the pattern tabs, then trace again.

With Fray Check, go over the lines of the round opening, top edges of the bag and short edges of the long piece, then let dry completely. This will soak through the fabric so make sure you have something underneath! Fray Check can darken some fabrics, so it would be a good idea to test a scrap piece first.

Cut out your pieces, then fold all tabs inward and iron down. The long piece’s pattern is divided into three sections. (marked with dotted lines) Fold and iron these down, then make small cuts in the tab on each side.

Line up the top edge of the long piece with the edge of a bag piece, then glue the tabs together. I’m not using a lot of glue here – just enough to hold it in place.

Repeat with the opposite side, then glue the middle section together.

Repeat with the second bag piece. You should have an inside out hay bag when you’re finished.

Sew the bag together along the folds. You could skip this step altogether (depending on how much glue you used) but I want a little more strength here.

Trim off the excess, then flip the bag right side out. Press the edges with an iron (or your fingers!) to shape it.

Add paint around the top edges and opening for faux binding. Remember to paint the inside edges too!

Cut three pieces of ribbon about an inch long. On two of the pieces, fold a small amount over and glue down.

Fold these in half and thread on a jump ring. With the folded side on the outside of the bag, glue over the top edge.

With the third ribbon piece, fold over one end, add a jump ring and glue in place. Fold and glue the excess, then glue to the back of the bag. On real hay bags, this ring is to add extra support to the bag when it’s tied up. On the model ones it’s just an extra detail, but it could be used if you wanted to. ๐Ÿ™‚

Your bag is finished! To make a simple hanging strap, glue a jump ring to one end of a piece of ribbon, and a hook to the other. (this one is from Rio Rondo but you could bend one out of wire if you’d like)

Fill the bag with hay (mine is a painted manila folder, cut into a bazillion tiny pieces) and hang someplace for the ponies to enjoy. ๐Ÿ™‚

The smaller ones are made the same way.

For the Schleich size, I saturated a piece of 1/8 ribbon in Fray Check, then split it in half to get a thinner piece.

Hope you enjoy!

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A couple weeks ago I ย stumbled across Enterprise Props. I had never heard of this prop maker, and going through their shop I felt like a kid in a candy store. I may have gone a little overboard with my order(s)! XD

On my PC, I have a folder full of real horse items I’d like to figure out how to make someday. But they’ve left me stumped, because the only way I could think of making them was either hope a manufacturer would, OR learn 3D modelling and get into 3D printing. (and after looking through it some I decided that nope, not going to tackle THAT!)

So I was really excited to see that everything I wanted in miniature was available on Enterprise Props’ website.

Literally, everything. o_o (and there are still more pieces I’d like to get… but I must resist for now…)

Anyway, I am so pleased with it all. I believe they are 3D printed, (not positive on that) and are both durable and lightweight. My second order included a few extra/surprise pieces as well – the red grooming box and set of salt licks. That was such a sweet surprise and I am so grateful! ^_^

Here are both grooming boxes:

I think these are my favorite because I’ve wanted a plastic grooming box forever.

They can be held by the dolls too, which is a huge bonus!

Here’s the small mounting block:

I made one many years ago from small jewelry boxes. It’s been needing an upgrade badly!

I really love the water trough…

… and the tiny feed scoop! It’s a little rough around the edges but it’s super cute.

I got really excited over the bucket. XD I made one a million years ago from a recycled medicine-dosage cup, but I’ve wanted one with a flat side and wasn’t sure how to accomplish that.

Here are the feed pans:

Got to get every… last… speck…

And last but not least, the salt licks:

Gahhh I love everything and it’s probably weird to get so excited over buckets and pans and things, but these are pieces I’ve been wanting for years. I’m so glad to add them to the mini stable!

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