Archive for the ‘Tutorials’ Category

Recently I was inspired to make hay bags for my models, and have turned it into a tutorial for you all.

This time I included Traditional, Classic and Schleich sizes on the pattern. πŸ™‚

You will need:

  • The PatternΒ – can’t open a PDF? Download this – it’s free!
  • Fabric (I use cotton as it’s easy to work with) + matching thread
  • 1/8 ribbon, jump rings and hook (etched or bent by hand)
  • Acrylic paint – this will be the “binding” around the edge
  • Fray Check, fabric glue (I use Fabri-Tac)
  • Iron – a flat iron can work nicely! πŸ˜‰

The first step is to iron your fabric to remove all wrinkles. Cut out your pattern and trace it onto the wrong side of your fabric. The pattern includes a seam allowance – you can add this in free hand or bend back the pattern tabs, then trace again.

With Fray Check, go over the lines of the round opening, top edges of the bag and short edges of the long piece, then let dry completely. This will soak through the fabric so make sure you have something underneath! Fray Check can darken some fabrics, so it would be a good idea to test a scrap piece first.

Cut out your pieces, then fold all tabs inward and iron down. The long piece’s pattern is divided into three sections. (marked with dotted lines) Fold and iron these down, then make small cuts in the tab on each side.

Line up the top edge of the long piece with the edge of a bag piece, then glue the tabs together. I’m not using a lot of glue here – just enough to hold it in place.

Repeat with the opposite side, then glue the middle section together.

Repeat with the second bag piece. You should have an inside out hay bag when you’re finished.

Sew the bag together along the folds. You could skip this step altogether (depending on how much glue you used) but I want a little more strength here.

Trim off the excess, then flip the bag right side out. Press the edges with an iron (or your fingers!) to shape it.

Add paint around the top edges and opening for faux binding. Remember to paint the inside edges too!

Cut three pieces of ribbon about an inch long. On two of the pieces, fold a small amount over and glue down.

Fold these in half and thread on a jump ring. With the folded side on the outside of the bag, glue over the top edge.

With the third ribbon piece, fold over one end, add a jump ring and glue in place. Fold and glue the excess, then glue to the back of the bag. On real hay bags, this ring is to add extra support to the bag when it’s tied up. On the model ones it’s just an extra detail, but it could be used if you wanted to. πŸ™‚

Your bag is finished! To make a simple hanging strap, glue a jump ring to one end of a piece of ribbon, and a hook to the other. (this one is from Rio Rondo but you could bend one out of wire if you’d like)

Fill the bag with hay (mine is a painted manila folder, cut into a bazillion tiny pieces) and hang someplace for the ponies to enjoy. πŸ™‚

The smaller ones are made the same way.

For the Schleich size, I saturated a piece of 1/8 ribbon in Fray Check, then split it in half to get a thinner piece.

Hope you enjoy!

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Here’s another easy DIY piece for your barn, a wall mounted bridle rack.

Like the saddle racks these use only a handful of materials. They’re easily customizable as well, if you wanted a longer (or shorter) rack, with or without a shelf. For the ones I made, I used:

  • 3 jumbo popsicle sticks, all cut to 5 inches
  • thick wire (I can’t remember the gauge, but it’s slightly thicker than a paperclip)
  • mini hand drill

I also used Aleene’s Tacky Glue, watered down paint for “stain” and gold alcohol ink.

The first thing you want to do is cut and sand your main pieces.

Next, plot out where you would like your hooks to go. I found it helpful to divide the stick into sections first, then find the center of each one. It was also helpful to lay a bridle on top of it, to give me a better idea of how many I could fit on the rack.

Drilling the holes was next. I chose a drill bit that was roughly the same size of the wire I wanted to use for the hooks.

Drill all the way through the wood, sanding them smooth afterwards. I ended up changing where I wanted the holes to be in this photo.

To make the hooks, cut small sections of wire (it’s better to have too much than not enough!) and bend them into shape. Β Getting them all the same size is really the hardest part of this project. XD

It’s also a good idea to compare them to a bridle. I wanted my hooks to be wide enough for a thick crown strap, and deep enough to hold it and the reins in place.

The next two steps are optional. I added a drop of glue to the end of each hook, to cover the sharp edge.

Once that dried, they were given a couple coats of gold alcohol ink.

To add a shelf, glue the top edge of the rack to a second stick. Propping it against something while it dries will help keep it straight.

I made two brackets by cutting another jumbo popsicle stick at a 45 degree angle. I cut the end off of each one…

… so it wouldn’t stick out from under the shelf once glued in place.

Add stain/paint/etc if desired.

Once dry, push all the hooks into the holes completely. Use wire cutters to snip off the excess from the back, getting as close to the wood as possible. Add a drop of glue (I’m using superglue here) for some added strength.

Seal everything with varnish (if you haven’t already) and your bridle rack is complete!

Hang it up, fill it up and enjoy. πŸ™‚

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I am building a miniature tack room.

This is part of a bigger, slightly insane project. It isn’t finished yet. But it is finished enough to show a few photos, and a couple things I’ve made for it I’ve turned into tutorials.

The first is an easy DIY – wall mounted saddle racks.

To make one, you will need:

  • One 1 3/4 in “jumbo” popsicle stick
  • Two 2 1/2 in regular popsicle sticks
  • One 2 1/2 in craft matchstick
  • One 1 3/4 in craft matchstick, with the ends angled (like a long, skinny trapezoid)

You will also need a tiny triangle – this is optional. To make this, cut a piece from a regular sized popsicle stick at a 45 degree angle. Using a mitre box is helpful!

Start by gluing the longer matchstick to one side of a popsicle stick. I’m using Aleene’s Tacky glue for this.

Once that sets, flip it over and glue the second popsicle stick ontop of the matchstick. Having something to prop it up against will help keep it straight.

Add the triangle to one end:

On the jumbo popsicle stick, make a mark 1/4 of an inch away from each end.

Glue the rack to this piece, using one of the marks as a guide. Here I like to use hot glue as it sets a lot faster.

Add glue to the angled ends of the remaining matchstick. Glue one end at the second mark, and the other underneath the rack. I like to add a drop of glue there as well, to make sure it will stay in place.

Stain if desired, (I use watered-down acrylic paint for “stain”) add varnish, and your saddle rack is complete!

Enjoy! πŸ™‚

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